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Posted by On 12:16 PM

Trump joked he could play matchmaker for India's prime minister, report says


President Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi hug while making statements in the Rose Garden of the White House on June 26, 2017. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post) August 13 at 9:41 AM Email the author

NEW DELHI â€" President Trump allegedly joked he could play matchmaker for Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi after learning from aides that the 67-year-old Indian leader has long been estranged from his wife, according to a new report in Politico. The article detailed a long list of “diplomatic faux-pas” Trump has made with foreign leaders around the globe, including a lack of telephone etiquette, “mispronunciations” and “awkward meetings.”

Trump also displayed a lack of familiarity with South Asia, according to the report.

Ahead of the meeting last year with Modi at the White House, Trump allegedly studied a map of South Asia and mispronounced Nepal as “nipple” and referred to Bhutan as “button,” Politico said, quoting two unnamed sources. The president seemed confused that the two countries â€" which border India â€" even existed, the report says.

“He didn’t know what those were. He thought it was all part of India,” a source told Politico. “He was like, ‘What is this stuff in between and these other countries?’”

After Trump’s staffers told the president that Modi would not be bringing his wife along to the meeting at the White House, Trump allegedly joked, “Ah, I think I can set him up with somebody,” the report said, according to “two people briefed on the meeting.”

White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders told Politico that Trump has developed “strong relationships” with "America’s closest allies,” which allow for “candid conversations.”

In truth, the issue of Modi’s wife is confounding â€" and a point of hilarity for some â€" even for Indians. The prime minister was married as a teen as part of a child marriage then typical of his social caste. He left his village and his wife shortly thereafter, but the couple never divorced. Until he declared his candidacy for office in 2014, he had never officially acknowledged her existence.

The wife, Jashodaben, a retired teacher now 66, lives quietly with family in a village in Modi’s home state of Gujarat.

Over the years her existence has proven a bit inconvenient for the prime minister, who embraces a bachelor lifestyle, arising at dawn for a round of morning yoga. She told The Post in 2015 that she still hopes to join her husband in the capital as his spouse.

Recently, when a politician from Modi’s party said at a function that the prime minister was not married, she felt strongly enough to issue a video correction, saying, “I was his wife. I am and would remain his wife and it is correct that he is married.”

Trump’s quip about playing matchmaker is not the first joke he’s had at Modi’s expense. According to a report from The Post earlier this year, Trump often affects an Indian accent and imitates the prime minister.

Although India and U.S. relations are basically sound, things have been tense in recent months because of clashes on trade and the administration’s decision to cancel an important meeting of the U.S. secretaries of defense and state with their respective Indian counterparts. It is now scheduled for Sept. 6.

Modi has invited Trump to be the chief guest at India’s Republic Day military parade on Jan. 26 â€" but there is no word yet whether the president will accept.

Source: Google News India | Netizen 24 India

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Posted by On 12:16 PM

Trump joked he could play matchmaker for India's prime minister, report says


President Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi hug while making statements in the Rose Garden of the White House on June 26, 2017. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post) August 13 at 9:41 AM Email the author

NEW DELHI â€" President Trump allegedly joked he could play matchmaker for Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi after learning from aides that the 67-year-old Indian leader has long been estranged from his wife, according to a new report in Politico. The article detailed a long list of “diplomatic faux-pas” Trump has made with foreign leaders around the globe, including a lack of telephone etiquette, “mispronunciations” and “awkward meetings.”

Trump also displayed a lack of familiarity with South Asia, according to the report.

Ahead of the meeting last year with Modi at the White House, Trump allegedly studied a map of South Asia and mispronounced Nepal as “nipple” and referred to Bhutan as “button,” Politico said, quoting two unnamed sources. The president seemed confused that the two countries â€" which border India â€" even existed, the report says.

“He didn’t know what those were. He thought it was all part of India,” a source told Politico. “He was like, ‘What is this stuff in between and these other countries?’”

After Trump’s staffers told the president that Modi would not be bringing his wife along to the meeting at the White House, Trump allegedly joked, “Ah, I think I can set him up with somebody,” the report said, according to “two people briefed on the meeting.”

White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders told Politico that Trump has developed “strong relationships” with "America’s closest allies,” which allow for “candid conversations.”

In truth, the issue of Modi’s wife is confounding â€" and a point of hilarity for some â€" even for Indians. The prime minister was married as a teen as part of a child marriage then typical of his social caste. He left his village and his wife shortly thereafter, but the couple never divorced. Until he declared his candidacy for office in 2014, he had never officially acknowledged her existence.

The wife, Jashodaben, a retired teacher now 66, lives quietly with family in a village in Modi’s home state of Gujarat.

Over the years her existence has proven a bit inconvenient for the prime minister, who embraces a bachelor lifestyle, arising at dawn for a round of morning yoga. She told The Post in 2015 that she still hopes to join her husband in the capital as his spouse.

Recently, when a politician from Modi’s party said at a function that the prime minister was not married, she felt strongly enough to issue a video correction, saying, “I was his wife. I am and would remain his wife and it is correct that he is married.”

Trump’s quip about playing matchmaker is not the first joke he’s had at Modi’s expense. According to a report from The Post earlier this year, Trump often affects an Indian accent and imitates the prime minister.

Although India and U.S. relations are basically sound, things have been tense in recent months because of clashes on trade and the administration’s decision to cancel an important meeting of the U.S. secretaries of defense and state with their respective Indian counterparts. It is now scheduled for Sept. 6.

Modi has invited Trump to be the chief guest at India’s Republic Day military parade on Jan. 26 â€" but there is no word yet whether the president will accept.

Source: Google News India | Netizen 24 India

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Posted by On 11:37 AM

Ben Stokes not recalled to England's squad to face India in third Test

England v India 2018 Ben Stokes not recalled to England’s squad to face India in third Test

• Stokes left out of squad as trial for affray continues
• England name same squad that beat India in second Test

Ollie Pop.
Ollie Pope exits the Lord’s pitch after England’s second Test win against India. The Surrey player has retained his place in an unchanged squad for the third Test at Trent Bridge. Photograph: Paul Childs/Action Images via Reuters

England have named an unchanged squad for the third Test against India at Trent Bridge, meaning there is no place for Ben Stokes.

Sto kes was left out of the squad that thrashed India by an innings and 159 runs in the rain-disrupted second Test at Lord’s as it clashed with the all-rounder’s trial for affray at Bristol crown court.

England should look ahead with Lazarus Bayliss after sealing series | Vic Marks Read more

There was the possibility of the 27-year-old, who played a key role in the first Test win at Edgbaston, returning to action in Nottingham as England look to take a 3-0 lead in the five-match series. But that will not be the case after the England and Wales Cricket Board named the same 13-man party who triumphed at Lord’s.

“The ECB will make an assessment of Ben Stokes’s availability after the trial in Bristol has concluded,” read a statement.

Stokes is charged with affray in the Clifton triangle area of Bristol during the early hours of 25 September last year. He is on trial with Ryan Ali, 28, who Stokes is alleged to have knocked unconscious in a figh t near the Mbargo nightclub that resulted in Ali sustaining a fractured eye socket. Both Stokes and Ali deny affray.

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An unchanged England squad means Keaton Jennings retains his place at the top of the order despite an underwelming showing so far this series, as well as another chance for Ollie Pope to stake a claim for a regular place in England’s lineup.

The third Test begins on Saturday.

England Test squad

Joe Root (Yorkshire), Moeen Ali (Worcestershire), Jimmy Anderson (Lancashire), Jonny Bairstow (Yorkshire), Stuart Broad (Nottinghamshire), Jos Buttler (Lancashire), Alastair Cook (Essex), Sam Curran (Surrey), Keaton Jennings (Lancashire), Ollie Pope (Surrey), Jamie Porter (Essex), Adil Rashid (Yorkshire), Chris Woakes (Warwickshire).

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Source: Google News India | Netizen 24 India

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Posted by On 10:24 AM

The Dreams of India's Restless Generation

In early August, a video surfaced of two twentysomething farmers in south India performing the “Kiki challenge,” an internet meme born from a song by the Canadian rapper Drake. Where their counterparts in other provinces of YouTube and Instagram danced alongside moving cars and on highways, Anil Geela and Pilli Tirupati strutted through a paddy field in the wake of an oxen-driven plough. Suburban Americans in cul-de-sacs had nothing on these lungi-clad men sashaying in rice paddies. Their muddy gyrating not only reached regional and national TV, but made it to BBC broadcasts and won the Twitter endorsements of The Daily Show’s Trevor Noah and Billboard magazine.

The video went viral because it seemed incongruous, with its strains of Drake’s “In My Feelings” layered over a scene of ancient rural toil. But it wasn’t some missive from a remote universe. It shouldn’t be surprisi ng that people in India’s hinterlands are not only connected to online trends, but aspire to be part of them. The video’s director had tried in the past to post popular videos from his village. “Nothing clicked,” he complained to The New York Times, “and suddenly this one small video became the rage. My father was flummoxed and asked me, ‘Why did this click?’”

The currency of the “click” has real value even in parts of India where the electrical grid is threadbare and internet access spotty. Thanks to the smartphone, young Indiansâ€"and there are many of them: over half of India’s population of 1.2 billion people is under the age of 25â€"tend to have a frame of reference that transcends their physical contexts. “A twenty-year-old in Indore has the same access to information as someone his age in Iowaâ€"and could very well have the same desires,” writes the journalist Snigdha Poonam in Dreamers: How Young Indians Are Changing the World. “[Young Indians] see no connection between where they live and what they want from their lives.”

Poonam profiles several young men whose aspirations belie their circumstances and whose thirst for recognition seems at times all-consuming. They include Azhar Khan, an aspiring model, who still in his early 20s had already tried his hand at a dizzying range of jobsâ€"from running a Chinese restaurant to selling hardware door-to-door to operating a shop that sold shirtsâ€"before he was encouraged by winning a provincial pageant to try his luck in Mumbai. There’s Pankaj Prasad, whose hustles including work as a fixer for local newspapers and as an intermediary for villagers seeking government services in the mineral-rich, insurgency-plagued state of Jharkhand, who has been on the make ever since he was a child selling calls on his cellphone to his neighbors in the village. There’s Vinay Singhal, the founder of WittyFeed, a website based in the second-tier city of Indore that rose to prominence a few years ago when its clickbait content regularly snared millions of American viewers with posts about Justin Bieber’s latest girlfriend or “Fifteen times Donald Trump was trolled hilariously.” Coming from a modest rural background, Singhal put no cap on his ambition. “I want to lead humanity,” he tells Poonam, before channeling Elon Musk. “Humanity is bigger than a country. I want to go outside the earth. I want humanity to be a multi-planetary existence. I want to lead Mars.”

Source: Google News India | Netizen 24 India

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Posted by On 10:24 AM

India returns to recruiting runners to ferry messages during local election after monsoon cuts off phone lines

India has recruited 15 runners to ferry messages as far as 27 miles in remote mountainous areas after heavy monsoon rains cut telecommunications.

State officials said the runners would be required to jog in relays in hilly terrain to provide a communication link between the Ranikor and South Tura assembly constituencies in northeastern Meghalaya state and the closest Commission office in the run up to and during voting on August 23.

Both constituencies have no roads, just narrow tracks and pathways connecting them to the rest of the state, and mobile telephone connectivity, especially during the ongoing monsoon rains, is mostly non-existent.

Nearly 540 people have died across India due to the monsoon showers that began in June and floods they triggered; this included some 40 fatalities in the northeastern region including Meghalaya and neighbouring Assam state.

In response, the Electoral Commission, responsible for overseeing all Indian elections, has hired the local ‘able bodied men’ with proven athletic prowess to keep it informed about the voting.

Chief area electoral officer Fredrick Roy Kharkongor said Ranikor assembly constituency had five polling booths, of which the furthest was 27 miles away from the nearest road.

Source: Google News India | Netizen 24 India